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  1. I feel beautiful for the flower.

I know "feel + adjective" is correct like "I feel sad" and "I feel sad for him", so I think I may say "I feel beautiful for the flower.".

  1. I feel the flower beautifully.

I hear "I feel the beauty of the flower" makes sense. Then, I wonder if "feel + a noun + adverb" make sense.

Could someone explain this?

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feel has several possible meanings: here are examples of two relevant meanings.

You can experience something, either physically or emotionally.

I feel the cloth - feel is a transitive verb, with the noun cloth as the object. cloth is a physical object, so this means that I physically touch the cloth

I feel the disappointment- feel is a transitive verb, with the noun disappointment as the object. Disappointment is an emotion, so I am experiencing the emotion

I feel angry - feel is a linking verb with the adjective angry as a modifier of the subject (I).

You can also use feel to express an opinion:

I feel that he is prepared - your opinion is he is prepared
I feel him to be prepared - your opinion is he is prepared


First sentence

I feel beautiful

works fine, because feel links the adjective beautiful to the subject I.

I feel sorry for you

works fine, because feel links the adjective sorry to the subject I, and for you explains why you feel sorrow.

I feel beautiful for the flower

this doesn't work, because beautiful applies to the speaker, and a flower cannot make the speaker feel beautiful. A dress might make you feel beautiful, and then you might say

I feel beautiful in this dress
I feel beautiful when I wear this dress
I feel beautiful because of this dress

Beautiful is not an emotion: it is a property. If you want to say that you are experiencing the flower having this property, you have to use a noun as the direct object:

I feel the beauty of the flower

Alternatively, you can use the that or to be constructions:

I feel that the flower is beautiful
I feel the flower to be beautiful


Second sentence

I feel the flower

The flower is physical, so this means that we are physically touching the flower.

I feel the flower gently

The adverb gently specifies the way that you touch the flower- in a gentle way.

I feel the flower beautifully

This doesn't really work for me, because I cannot imagine a way to touch a flower in a beautiful way.

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  • Thank you for the very helpful answer. Does "I feel beautiful" mean "I feel that I am beautiful"? – Yuuichi Tam Dec 29 '16 at 17:06
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    There is a slight difference: The first is experiencing an emotion: the second is expressing an opinion. The difference is greater if the adjective relates to an emotion, for example angry. – JavaLatte Dec 29 '16 at 18:08
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  1. I feel beautiful for the flower.

Saying "I feel beautiful" is fine, but adding "for the flower" doesn't quite make sense. It's hard to imagine a scenario in which you feeling beautiful is to the flower's benefit, which is the only way I can imagine this usage making sense. Something like "I feel beautiful for my husband" feels slightly more acceptable - it implies that the person making the statement feels beautiful and this is to the benefit of their husband, although it's still a bit of a stretch. I assume what you're trying to convey is that you feel the flower is beautiful, so I would suggest:

I feel that the flower is beautiful.

I feel the beauty of the flower.

There are other ways to express what I think you're trying to, but these are the closest I can think of to your original sentence.

Moving on to:

  1. I feel the flower beautifully.

This I think does make sense, but again probably doesn't convey the meaning you are trying to express. To me, the above sentence is stating that you feel the flower (either emotionally, metaphorically or even perhaps physically) and the way in which you are feeling the flower is beautiful, or perhaps the nature of the flower (and its own beauty) makes that interaction beautiful for you.

It is certainly possible to have feel + [noun] + [adverb], for example:

I feel the pain sharply.

but it's just that in this particular case I don't think your sentence expresses the meaning you are trying to communicate.

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