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I was writing an e-mail and stuck on this part:

"...a certificate will be sent to your address as the local representative’s."

I have doubts about the apostrophe. Actually I did sent e-mail without it, now I'm worrying I should have put apostrophe.

Please give share your knowledge: to apostrophe or not to apostrophe?

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  • "sent to your address as the local representative’s" = "sent to your address as being that of the local representative". – Edwin Ashworth Dec 29 '16 at 16:00
  • As @EdwinAshworth said. I think you're trying to write a more formal version of "Since you are the local representative, a certificate will be sent to your address". Is that the sense? – John Feltz Dec 29 '16 at 20:31
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Is there one representative or are there several? In either case I see no need for any apostrophe.

If it is a singular person:

...a certificate will be sent to your address as the local representative.

If there are more than one person:

...a certificate will be sent to your address as the local representatives.

There is no possessive form needed and hence no need for an apostrope.

  • It depends on what Mary is trying to say ... but yeah, best guess from context is that there is no need for the apostrophe. – Andrew Dec 29 '16 at 19:52

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