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Here is full sentence:

On December 23, 1944, one week into the Battle of the Bulge, the cloudy permitting weather began to give way to clear sunny skies over the Ardennes Forest. The USAAF and RAF had been grounded for the time being, unable to assist the troops on the ground, allowing for the rampant German successes. But now the planes began to thunder into the sky and do what they did best. As soon as the clouds parted American and British planes went to work. Raids on German supply routes were carried out and P-47 Thunderbolts, like the one in this lovely painting, hammered ground troops and tanks. Hitler's true ally in the offensive, the weather, had turned against him.

Or you can see here. I'm learning english through short sentence.

Which of the following is correct:

the cloudy permitting weather began to give way to clear sunny skies over the Ardennes Forest.

or

the cloudy weather permitting began to give way to clear sunny skies over the Ardennes Forest.

I can find "weather permitting" on the internet, can't find "permitting weather". So which is correct?

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  • CDO has: 'permitting adjective [ only after n ]'. It is, however, arguable whether or not this usage should be considered that of an adjective; it's a reduced modifying clause. // I downvoted for lack of research shown on a question demanding it even more than most, to counter the unacceptable (in my opinion) upvote. – Edwin Ashworth Dec 29 '16 at 16:58
  • @EdwinAshworth I don't think this is adj. Maybe the writer is not native speaker? – The Hung Dec 29 '16 at 17:00
  • To native speakers, that phrase does not make any sense which is probably why it was so confusing to you too. My best guess is that the writer might have wanted to convey the idea that the partly cloudy sky opened up to a clear sunny sky. I can also maybe guess that the conditions were conducive for clouds which benefitted the enemy (allowing them to conceal themselves in the clouds). In either event, the phrasing was very confusing. Best of luck with your English! :-) – Kristina Lopez Dec 29 '16 at 22:12
  • This is clearly a mistake of some kind, but exactly what the author actually meant is unclear. Given that this is a social media posting, the author might have been using a phone keyboard or similar device, which also opens up the possibility of "swipe-os" which can go much further afield than traditional typos. Looking at descriptions of weather at the time, something like "intermittently cloudy", "cloudy, foggy" or "cloudy, overcast" seems most likely, but I have no idea how any of the obvious possibilities turned into "cloudy permitting". – 1006a Dec 30 '16 at 22:18
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"On December 23, 1944, one week into the Battle of the Bulge, the cloudy permitting weather began to give way to clear sunny skies over the Ardennes Forest."

My opinion is that the author of this paragraph improperly used cloudy permitting instead of cloud permitting.

"...the cloud permitting weather began to give way to clear sunny skies..."

To me, cloud permitting, together, is an adjective phrase that modifies weather.

So, based on this opinion, the author is trying to say that a weather that is cloud permitting has begun to clear up. So the clouds are starting to move away, allowing for clear, sunny weather, instead of cloudy weather.

That being said, both usages are unidiomatic to say the least. Permitting, in my opinion, does not need to be there at all. A rewritten version of that sentence could be:

"On December 23, 1944, one week into the Battle of the Bulge, the cloudy weather began to give way to clear sunny skies over the Ardennes Forest."

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    'Cloud-permitting' is so unidiomatic as to be incorrect even though arguably grammatical. – Edwin Ashworth Dec 29 '16 at 17:15
  • @EdwinAshworth I'm not arguing that it is a usage that is correct. I'm simply specifying what I thought the author meant to say, not condoning his tactics. Let me clarify in the post that is not my intention. – Hank Dec 29 '16 at 17:17
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    I'd guess it was a typo for 'permeating' and attempt at 'permeating cloudy weather' if I was forced to. But I certainly wouldn't proceed to the status an 'answer' confers. There's no profit in this sort of speculation. And post-modification, adjectives vs participles, and absloute constructions have been thoroughly covered in previous threads. – Edwin Ashworth Dec 29 '16 at 17:36
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I think Hank's answer has already addressed the "permitting weather" option, but I'd like to expand on why the other proposed possibility doesn't work:

The phrase weather permitting is normally an idiom that is essentially shorthand for "If the weather conditions are suitable". You will generally see it as a comma-separated clause in constructions that refer to future outdoor activities, such as

Weather permitting, the soccer game will start at 5pm.

or

We hope to go skiing tomorrow, weather permitting.

Since the given text is referring to a past outdoor activity, the use of "weather permitting" cannot be interpreted in this fashion; it would have to be "weather that allows for (something)". But the rest of the sentence cannot be used to support that reading either. Therefore, "weather permitting" would not work at all there.

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