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From wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_Serling#Radio

Serling started at the bottom, with no writing credits, no published work and no hands-on experience.

But I have always heard

started from the bottom

and not

started at the bottom

E.g. in this popular song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RubBzkZzpUA

Which form is correct?

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    It might depend what is being referenced. I might say "started from the bottom of a ladder," but "started at the bottom of the ocean." I'm pretty sure this is one of those cases where there isn't a single "correct" preposition, but a stylistic choice. – J.R. Oct 16 '13 at 21:49
  • Thanks, which form is more used by the native EN speakers? – Derfder Oct 17 '13 at 7:45
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    If you are emphasizing starting from the bottom, going to the top, you'd use from, simply to allow for the from..to construct. However, if you are only emphasizing the starting point, with little regard to the rest of the trajectory, then using at might be preferable. This aligns with the Wikipedia article you cited, as the sentence you've quoted here kicks off a long narrative about Serling's early career, before mentioning the start of his professional career four years (and six paragraphs) later. – J.R. Oct 17 '13 at 8:50
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It might depend what is being referenced.

I might say “started from the bottom of a ladder,” but “started at the bottom of the ocean.”

I'm pretty sure this is one of those cases where there isn't a single “correct” preposition, but a stylistic choice.
(comment by J.R.)

If you are emphasizing starting from the bottom, going to the top, you'd use “from,” simply to allow for the “from..to” construct. However, if you are only emphasizing the starting point, with little regard to the rest of the trajectory, then using “at” might be preferable.

This aligns with the Wikipedia article you cited, as the sentence you've quoted here kicks off a long narrative about Serling's early career, before mentioning the start of his professional career four years (and six paragraphs) later.
(comment by J.R.)

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