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to miss: [transitive] to feel sad because you can no longer see somebody or do something that you like

miss somebody/something

She will be greatly missed when she leaves.

What did you miss most when you were in France?

miss (somebody/something) doing something I don't miss getting up at six every morning!

I often hear "Who do you miss? / I miss my wife" not "Who are you missing? / I am missing my wife"

so, my question is:

do we have continuous form for the verb "miss (miss here means to feel sad because you can no longer see somebody or do something that you like)"?

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  • You can use a progressive form of stative verb to express a temporal state. I had been missing you until you came
    – user178049
    Jan 1 '17 at 3:49
  • Example: "Now that we're divorced, I find myself missing the very things that used to annoy me about my ex-wife."
    – Robusto
    Jan 1 '17 at 4:17
  • Sure, I hear people say it a lot: I'm missing you a lot personally, I find the continuous form more emphasizing, like when you intend to say that you have REALLY been missing someone/thing pretty often, constantly.
    – Davyd
    Jan 1 '17 at 4:21
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I am right. This site says "Miss" (to feel sad because you can no longer see somebody or do something that you like) is Non-Continuous Verb.

to miss:

John misses Sally. Non-Continuous Verb

He is sad because she is not there.

Debbie is missing her favorite TV program. Normal Verb

She is not there to see her favorite program.

But I don't understand why dictionaries doesn't mention this??

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  • A dictionary dont mention non-continuous(stative) verb because it's something that should be learnt.
    – user178049
    Jan 1 '17 at 7:25

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