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I have been taking a look at the verb approach, which is a verb that I find very interesting, containing many different meanings, and one from which works in many different ways. However, when talking about the verb approach that means something moving nearer something/one: I was able to hear the sirenes of the ambulance approaching to the local. Must "to" be proceeded after "approach" when it implies to say something moving nearer or getting closer to someone/thing? Is this how it was supposed to be: I was able to hear the sirenes of the ambulance approaching the local or otherwise?

Also, check these examples out: As I walked down the hill two thieves came out of an alley and approached to me

Or

As I walked down the hill two thieves came out of an alley and approached me.

I can hear an airplane approaching us

Or

I can hear an airplane approaching to us ?

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    You might also look at the noun approach. For example "The airplane is on (the) approach to the runway. – user3169 Jan 1 '17 at 6:40
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The preposition to is not necessary, since approaching implies moving towards something/someone unlike going/coming which may need additional context "going/coming to"

You might use a presposition if the perspective is different

The ambulance was approaching from the main entrance of the hospital.
the ambulance was coming from the main entrance

The ambulance was approaching the hospital.
the ambulance was going to the hospital

In your other examples

As I walked down the hill two thieves came out of an alley and approached to me
As I walked down the hill two thieves came out of an alley and came to me

I can hear an airplane approaching to us
I can hear an airplane coming to us

  • So, if I said: The ambulance was approaching from the main entrance of the hospital to the parking lot. Would 'to' be necessary in this sentence? – Davyd Jan 1 '17 at 15:45
  • No, you don't need to use "to", "The ambulance was approaching the parking lot from the main entrance", "I was standing in the parking lot when the ambulance approached from the main entrance", both convey that the ambulance was moving from the main entrance to the parking lot. – Peter Jan 1 '17 at 16:04
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According to Michael Swan in his Practical English Usage, no preposition is used after approach. E.g.

The train is now approaching London Paddington. (NOT ... approaching to ...)

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