0

In this situation:

She doesn't take after her sister at all! Her treatment is totally different to her sister.

vs:

She doesn't take after her sister at all! Her treatment is totally different from her sister.

2

Different is most often used with from, so

She doesn't take after her sister at all! Her treatment is totally different from her sister.

would be the natural option for most people.

1

Different to is pretty rare, and it expresses no distinct nuance; there is no reason why you should ever use anything except different from.

However, you should take care in any comparison to make sure that you are comparing things which are actually comparable. Of course "her treatment" is different from "her sister"—one is an action, the other is a person! What you probably mean is

Her treatment is totally different from her sister'stthat is, her sister's treament.

Note, moreover, that take after is ordinarily used to express inheritable similarities, most often similarities of physical appearance but sometimes of behaviors and attitudes. If what you mean by "her treatment" is the way she treats somebody or something, you need to specify that (her treatment of Joe); if what you mean is the treatment she is receiving, take after doesn't come into play at all.


Google Ngrams suggests that to is somewhat more common in BrE than AmE, but has never risen to 10% of the frequency of from even in BrE.

  • Thanks @StoneyB So "different to" is more common in British English than in American English! – Armin Jan 3 '17 at 12:09
  • @Amin Yes; but it is UNcommon in both. – StoneyB Jan 3 '17 at 12:51

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