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I want to use a word/phrase to mean separated/distant in the context of time, Can I use phrase 'spaced out' in this context?

Surprise quizzes have been spaced out lately, just 2 in 5 weeks.

or

My visits to this restaurant have been very spaced out.

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    I wouldn't use spaced out at all in these contexts. Metaphoric use of [widely] spaced out in the "temporal" (as opposed to "spatial") sense is credible, but usually it would probably be better to stick with more direct phrasing. Such as less common, or infrequent. – FumbleFingers Oct 17 '13 at 17:59
  • In particular, spaced out has the idiomatic meaning of being inattentive, absentminded, or otherwise "not in the here-and-how" mentally, and this sense could be read into both of your example sentence. – chrylis -on strike- Oct 17 '13 at 20:31
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    "Sporadic" might also suit your needs without the possible interpretation of visiting said restaurant in a daze, but I think saying it your way is OK as well. – Tyler James Young Oct 17 '13 at 21:17
  • Spaced all by itself means separated. You may say 'widely spaced' in these examples, or 'closely spaced' when you mean closer together in time, or 'spaced at X intervals' when you are being more precise. – StoneyB Oct 17 '13 at 22:29
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I wouldn't use “spaced out” at all in these contexts. Metaphoric use of “[widely] spaced out” in the temporal (as opposed to spatial) sense is credible, but usually it would probably be better to stick with more direct phrasing. Such as “less common”, or “infrequent”.
(comment by FumbleFingers)

In particular, “spaced out” has the idiomatic meaning of being inattentive, absentminded, or otherwise not in the here-and-now mentally, and this sense could be read into both of your example sentences.
(comment by chrylis)

“Sporadic” might also suit your needs without the possible interpretation of visiting said restaurant in a daze, but I think saying it your way is OK as well.
(comment by Tyler James Young)

“Spaced” all by itself means separated. You may say “widely spaced” in these examples, or “closely spaced” when you mean closer together in time, or “spaced at X intervals” when you are being more precise.
(comment by StoneyB)

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    I added attributions to the source links due to the ephemeral nature of comments. – Jonathan Garber Oct 18 '13 at 20:10

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