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Oxford Dictionaries Online gives the following definition for the phrasal verb shake down:

become established in a new place or situation; settle down

And it gives the following example sentence for this meaning:

It was disruptive to the industry as it was shaking down after deregulation.

I know shaking down here means "restoring". But how could shaking down be a disruptive thing? Or do the two its in the sentence have different denotations?

  • I think I've got the meaning myself as soon as I post this qeustion up. In this sentence, the first "it" refers to a certain disruptive action taken to the industry. Whereas the second "it" acturally denotes "industry". The sentence is saying that a bad act would disrupt the industry as the industry was still recovering. Am I right? – dennylv Oct 18 '13 at 4:36
  • The sentence is quoted from a dictionary and I don't have any surrounding imformation... – dennylv Oct 18 '13 at 5:29
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    I've added the quote and the citation based on your comment. Could you please do this yourself in the future? Otherwise, users might write answers that misunderstand the question because you haven't given them all the relevant information. – snailboat Oct 18 '13 at 6:23
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The first "it" is referring to some condition or action that disrupted the industry. The second "it" is referring to the industry that was in the unstable shaking down state when the outside influence disrupted it further.

  • I think I've got the meaning myself as soon as I post this qeustion up. In this sentence, the first "it" refers to a certain disruptive action taken to the industry. Whereas the second "it" acturally denotes "industry". The sentence is saying that a bad act would disrupt the industry as the industry was still recovering. Am I right? – dennylv Oct 18 '13 at 4:37
  • @dennylv That's pretty much it! – chrylis Oct 18 '13 at 5:02
  • One more question:Which is correct, "posted my question up" or "posted my question on" – dennylv Oct 18 '13 at 5:16
  • @dennylv Just "posted my question". – chrylis Oct 18 '13 at 5:26

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