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I wrote:

Although the moon's light is less than the sun's, but in the darkness of the night that much [of] light is so precious.

I mean something like:

Although the moon's light is less than the sun's, but in the darkness of the night that amount of light, (however few / even if few / no matter how few), is so precious.

1- Does "that much light" in #1 could mean "that amount of light"? Note that I don't mean very much light, just the amount which is even less than the sun light. Do I need "of" in the phrase?

2- Are however few or even if few or no matter how correct and idiomatic to say the amount is not important?


P.S. its a part of a joke or a moral story, so don't get the sentence seriously

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Possibly your first sentence could be reformulated as

Although the moon's brightness is much less than the sun's, in the darkness of night, even that little light is precious.

In your second sentence either "small" or "little" is usually used to describe light, "dim" is also possible, "few" would not be used since light in not countable.

that amount of light, however small
that amount of light eventhough small
that amount of light, no matter how little

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