1

"Come sleep with me. We won't make love. Love will make us." - Julio Cortazar

What does the part of "love will make us" mean?

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Nathan Tuggy, Andrew, Glorfindel, Em. Jan 5 '17 at 22:49

  • This question does not appear to be about learning the English language within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • It's poetic. What do you think it means? – Andrew Jan 5 '17 at 21:11
  • 1
    It sounds like the meaning of this is ambiguous and up for interpretation – Canadian Coder Jan 5 '17 at 21:11
  • @mcraen it is and this question will probably be closed as a result. But I think christie can ask over at ELU if it is. – Andrew Jan 5 '17 at 21:24
  • 2
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's just "playing with words" - the intended meaning (if any) is a matter of interpretation. @Andrew: It would still be POB on ELU. – FumbleFingers Jan 5 '17 at 21:50
  • @FumbleFingers is there an SE site dedicated to literary interpretation? – Andrew Jan 5 '17 at 21:53
0

It's a play on the phrase "make love", which means to have sexual intercourse.

In this context Julio is saying that the sex will make both himself and his partner(s) who they are (or rather, who they will be, since the event is in the future). This is in direct contrast to the usual usage of "make love", which describes an activity which is distinct from the participants.

It's also worth noting that "make love" has emotional connotations beyond "sexual intercourse", and is a gentler, more polite expression.

  • Could you please go into more detail about what you mean by "make both himself and his partner(s)?" i.e. what is the figurative and poetic use of "make" in this context? – Andrew Jan 5 '17 at 21:16

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.