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I read the following paragraph on page3 from the book The year of Billy Miller by Kevin Henkes.

The next thing Billy remembered was waking up in a hospital. His parents, whom he called Mama and Papa, were with him, as was his three-year-old sister, Sally, whom everyone called Sal.

As for the bold sentence, I can understand its meaning but not its grammatical function. My questions about the sentence are listed as follows:

1,Is it a dependent clause or independent clause? If it is a dependent clause, what type it is?

2,Is as here a pronoun?

3, Is as was derive from as is? I did not find any detailed explanation, and there is only one dictionary explains that the meaning of as was is in a previous state

  • In this case 'as was' is used to show that Sally is 'with him' along with his parents. The sentence could have been written as 'His parents and his sister Sally were with him", but that would make the subordinate clauses "whom he called mama and papa" and "whom everyone called Sal" difficult to include in the sentence in a non-confusing way. – Mark Ripley Jan 6 '17 at 7:05
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To answer your second question first:  No, it is not a pronoun.  However, like a pronoun, it is an anaphor and it does have an antecedent. 

His parents were with him.  His sister was with him. 
His parents were with him, as was his sister. 

The antecedent of "as" is the prepositional phrase "with him". 
 

To answer your last question second:  No, the two uses are not closely related.  The "as" of "as [it] is" (meaning in its current condition or without warranty) uses a different sense of the word "as" -- one which doesn't act as an anaphor. 
 

To respond to your first question:  I don't recognize "as" as a coordinating conjunction.  Instead, I consider the subordinate clause to be adverbial and supplemental, modifying the entire independent clause rather than any particular word or phrase within it. 

However, a sensible argument could be made that suggests that the two clauses are independent: 

His parents were with him, as was his sister. 
His parents were with him, and so was his sister. 

We can replace this "as" with "and so", letting the "and" carry the conjunctive function and the "so" carry the anaphoric.  In this case, "and" is clearly coordinating two independent clauses. 

  • So in your point of view, as was his sister is a dependent clause, which functions as an adverb, modifies the entire independent clause, and tells us that the parents did the same thing as the sister did. is that right? – Henry Wang Jan 9 '17 at 9:05
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His parents, whom he called Mama and Papa, were with him,as was his three-year-old sister, Sally, whom everyone called Sal.

His parents were with him, as was his three-year-old sister(and his sister also was with him) or (as well as his sister).

1.It's an independent clause

2."As" is a conjunction which function is "addition" (and).

3."Was" is in the past simple. It corresponds to "were" in the first independent clause.

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