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Check out these two examples of each construction:

Does she steal people, kill them and hide the body?

Does she steal people, kills them and hides the body?

  • Which one is the right one between these two above? And why?

Doesn't she steal people, kill them and hide the body?

Doesn't she steal people, kills them and hides the body?

  • Which one of these above is the right one? And why?

I must have skipped this lesson, the impressive thing is that I must have never come across such sentences, and it went through my mind. Which one of each example is the right and why? And what English rule talks about it?

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    The three VPs are a single conjunct, of which the auxiliary Does marks the interrogative and bears the tense, taking all the lexical verbs in as dependents, so all the lexicals must be cast in the infinitive--steal, kill, hide. ... By the way, we don't usually speak of stealing people (except occasionally infants) but of kidnapping or abducting them; and body should be cast in the plural, since each of the persons abducted and killed has a body. – StoneyB on hiatus Jan 8 '17 at 0:49
  • So: He does his homework, plays video-game and watches TV would be right, since does isn't being used as an auxiliary but a normal verb, right? – Davyd Jan 8 '17 at 1:57
  • @DavydDiniz between this and the subject of some of your previous questions, I'm starting to get a little worried about you ... – Andrew Jan 8 '17 at 2:37
  • @DavydDiniz You've got it exactly right with does, plays, watches. – StoneyB on hiatus Jan 8 '17 at 9:45
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Very odd sentences to be used as learning material!

The first is correct. The "rule" is that when a verb is used with "do" as an auxillary, the infinitive form of the verb is used.

"He does like chips", not *"He does likes chips"

In questions, the do form is used:

"Does he like chips?", not *"Does he likes chips?"

If several verbs are used, the auxillary "does" can be omitted, all the verbs are in infinitive form.

"Does he like chips, eat them and enjoy the taste"

is a shortend version of

"Does he like chips? Does he eat them? Does he enjoy the taste?"

Negative questions are formed similarly, with infintives.

(Unrelated note. It is possible to steal a person. However, "kidnap a person" or "capture a person" would be more commonly used)

  • I see. Just like StoneyB suggested about Steal. So: He does his homework, plays video-game and watches TV would be right, since does isn't being used as an auxiliary but a normal verb, right? – Davyd Jan 8 '17 at 1:57

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