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The negotiation was not successful until 70s but the British government eventually accepted to release the areas in exchange for other areas. Hence, the transportation and financial developments are implemented quickly in Admiralty, making our city more flourish. ... (flourish? flourishing?)

"Flourish" can be a verb or a noun instead of an adjective. Should I turn "flourish" into "flourishing"? I am not familiar with this word and it is not easy to pronounce. Can another word be used to replace it?

  • Writing transportation is not really necessary. Writing the word transport will be sufficient, with no change in meaning dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/… – Tristan Oct 20 '13 at 11:47
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    Flourish is only a verb or noun; it is not used as an adjective. – StoneyB on hiatus Oct 20 '13 at 13:15
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    It's true that there's a suffix -ish which forms adjectives, which comes from Old English -isc. But although it looks the same, this is not the same ish; this ish, which you can find in abolish, banish, brandish, cherish, demolish, embellish, establish, finish, flourish, furnish, garnish, impoverish, languish, nourish, perish, polish, ravish, refurbish, relinquish, and replenish, comes from Old French -iss- and forms verbs rather than adjectives. – snailcar Oct 20 '13 at 15:33
  • I would prefer "until the 1970s" (or maybe 1870s?) to "until 70s". Instead of "are implemented" probably "were implemented" could be better, because you are not writing about today but the 1970s, don't you? – Stephen Oct 20 '13 at 16:12
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    Casper Li, I didn't know that. In that case, you would not need to add the but, you would need to make it clear that you are talking about Admiralty the place. You could do that just before the quote in your question or, adjust the relevant line to something like in Admiralty, Hong Kong,. – Tristan Oct 20 '13 at 20:16
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Saying more flourishing would be grammatically correct, but a better construction would be simply to say

[...] are implemented quickly, [...] making our city flourish.

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    I might have said, "allowing our city to flourish" – Jim Oct 21 '13 at 3:45

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