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I am going to make up a sentence.

With a great business mind and excellent financial skills, Mary makes a lot of money every year.

Does it make sense to use an adverb to mean "a lot of" as in my revised sentence below?

With a great business mind and excellent financial skills, Mary makes money substantially (or considerably or gainfully) every year.

Please give me your feedback.

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  • The terms usually precede the noun: Mary makes a substantial amount of money every year. /Make money substantially/ is not idiomatic: make money honestly, dishonestly, properly etc. You have not put in /a lot of/. You have put in three adverbs that don't work here. :)
    – Lambie
    Jan 11 '17 at 0:02
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As with most English sentences, there are many ways to say something. In this case none of the words really work, but here are some examples of how they may be used:

Mark has a considerable yearly income / Mary's yearly income is considerable

Mary makes a substantial amount of money each year / The amount of money she makes each year is substantial.

Mary is gainfully employed.

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  • May I bring up two more adverbs for my example? Can I say: With a great business mind and excellent financial skills, Mary makes money wisely or effectively.? Do these two adjectives work? Thanks.
    – davidtrinh
    Jan 11 '17 at 6:03
  • Yes, those work better, although a native speaker would still use a different idiom. "Mary manages her money wisely/effectively"
    – Andrew
    Jan 11 '17 at 17:28

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