1

Disclaimer. It is not a question on the meaning of the expression. Repeat. Not about what the message it conveys.

I've seen somewhere the expression below.

More X than the peanut butter aisle.

I do understand the meaning it's suppose to convey. "There are thirteen X in a dozen", as we Swedes say - there are excessively many such items. However, I haven't found any references to that expression when googlearching it.

Semantic question

I'd like to know if it's a canonical expression or rather a case of creative freedom by the author.

Grammatical question

Shouldn't the expression say "more X than jars of peanut butter in the aisle? I guess it can be idiomatic, hence correct as-is, but I'd still like a confirmation.

Or am I confused and there's a specific meaning to GIF that somehow refers to aid jars?

2

It's not an idiom or common expression. It's a case of creative freedom by the author. He's making a joke. He writes

Warning: More GIFs than the peanut butter aisle.

Yes, I pronounce it “Jiff”. Go away.

Jif is a brand of peanut butter. enter image description here

So he's saying that he has a lot of gifs by saying that he has more Jif than the peanut butter aisle. The peanut butter aisle would have a lot of peanut butter/Jif (if such an aisle were to exist). It's like if someone wanted to brag and say, "I have more Glocks than the gun store."

For the grammatical question, "more Jif/GIFs than jars of peanut butter in the aisle" makes sense, but the joke is then lost. Part of the reason is that you would be comparing the amount of Jif you have to the number of jars of peanut butter that some random aisle has, as opposed to comparing the amount of Jif you have to the amount of Jif the peanut butter aisle has (which is presumably a lot, in the US). Again, it would be like someone bragging "I have more Glocks than the number of guns in the store", instead of the first brag above.

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