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Could you please tell me if there is an error in this sentence?

Unless you are careful, you are bound to make mistake in your work.

The book offers:

(a) Unless you are careful,
(b) you are bound to make mistake
(c) in your work.
(d) No error.

  • 1
    First, can you tell us what you think about it? – snailcar Oct 22 '13 at 9:45
  • since i am begieer in eng lang i suppose bound should be replced with abound – gandhigcpp Oct 22 '13 at 9:46
  • Did the test guide where you found this give the answer? BTW, replacing bound with abound is NOT the right answer, but it's always good to present a theory when you ask a question like this. That accomplishes two things: (1) it lets us know you've put some thought into it, and (2) it helps the rest of the community more accurately diagnose where you might be confused. – J.R. Oct 22 '13 at 9:56
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The problem is in part (b). The sentence could be rewritten in one of two ways:

Unless you are careful, you are bound to make a mistake in your work.

or:

Unless you are careful, you are bound to make mistakes in your work.

But, in English, we don't say make mistake. We can make mistakes, or make a mistake, if we are making only one.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    (opinion) The second option seems more natural to me, perhaps because a seems slightly too specific when talking about mistakes in general. – snailcar Oct 22 '13 at 10:49
  • @snail - I'd concur with that opinion for the general case. There might be a few specific exceptions, though, such as a math teacher giving advice about how to do a proof. – J.R. Oct 22 '13 at 16:38

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