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On the one hand the clauses are restrictive, on the other hand, there is a preposition in the second case, So, it seems the correct version is "I need a book that is cheap enough, but in which there are cute photos", but this sounds awful.

So, what is the correct choice?

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    I need a cheap book with cute pictures
    – V.V.
    Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 13:47
  • No, this is a different sentence
    – Serguei
    Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 14:01

1 Answer 1

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You are correct, the sentence is

I need a book that is cheap enough, but in which there are cute photos.

and you are also correct that it is verbose, the suggested alternative

I need a cheap book with cute pictures.
I need an affordable book with pictures.
I need an inexpensive book with pictures.

might be better.

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  • In the sentece that I'm really trying to formulate instead of just "cheap" and "cute pictures" huge phrases stand, so the brief version is not an option
    – Serguei
    Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 17:45
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    It's shorter and more direct, but a "cheap book" [= economical] does not carry the same meaning as "a book that is cheap enough" [=affordable]
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 18:09
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    @Serguei Why do you want to have huge phrases?
    – Peter
    Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 18:31
  • It takes a rare talent to write academical texts in succint clear phrases. My command of English is definitely insufficient :(
    – Serguei
    Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 19:57

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