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I'm thinking about a situation like this:

  • John started working at this company 2 years ago.
  • Mary started working at this company 1 year ago.

So, I want to say that Mary is working at this company having started "more recently" and (thus) "during a shorter period" than John. How could I convey that idea in a correct and concise way?

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    use the word seniority? – WRX Jan 15 '17 at 22:35
  • @WillowRex: Thanks for the tip. Yes, the word "seniority" may help here. How would you use it in this particular context? – ricmarques Jan 15 '17 at 23:31
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    John has more seniority than Mary; Mary has less seniority than John. – John Feltz Jan 16 '17 at 0:21
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    John has more seniority than Mary. Or, Mray has less seniority than John. If you need to say how long, add that in. John has a year's more senority than Mary, who started last January. – WRX Jan 16 '17 at 0:24
  • @WillowRex: Sounds good :-) If you wish, write an answer saying that and I will gladly accept it (today or tomorrow). Also thanks to John Feltz. – ricmarques Jan 16 '17 at 0:35
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John has more seniority than Mary. Or, Mary has less seniority than John. If you need to say how long, add that in. John has a year's more senority than Mary, who started last January.

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