6

In one of the Toy Story 3 dialogues, there's a conversation after the toys were played (and abused) by the children in the Sunnyside care:

Mr. Potato Head: You know all that bad stuff I said about Andy's attic? I take it all back.
Hamm: You said it.

What does "You said it" mean here? Is it:

  • A claim, like "You have already said it, and I note it. Don't complain if we end up getting back in Andy's attic, it's all your fault."
  • A disagreement, like "It's your wish. Not mine. As for me, I'm not going back into the attic."
  • An agreement, like "Yeah, nobody can say it any better."

Which one is it? And why it was perceived like that? I mean, why you use a "You said it" to express the meaning that you think it is? Because from the perspective of my native language, that line can be perceived into all those three meanings. Thanks.

  • 1
    Short Answer: The third one. Long Answer: I haven't watched Toy Story 3 before, but I have a feeling that the line was, "You said it," and that the the emphasis was on "You," in which case, it would have been clear that it meant that the second person was agreeing with the first person. Either way, it was probably the third meaning. – Teacher KSHuang Jan 16 '17 at 8:16
8

It is the third one.

An agreement, like "Yeah, nobody can say it any better."

"You said it!" is a phrase that means "I agree completely with what you said." It means the same as the similar phrase "You can say that again!"

It has this meaning in this situation because Hamm says it in isolation as an interjection, and the other toys are agreeing in this scene.

"You said it!" could also be short for "You said it, not me!". As in "I might agree, but I wasn't going to say that myself". But that does not make sense in this situation because Mr. Potato's statement isn't controversial.

Your first two definitions aren't common meanings for "You said it!" in English (especially without more context in the sentence).

  • Your first two definitions aren't common meanings for "You said it!" in English (especially without more context in the sentence). --> this is the information I needed for. :) Thanks! – Chen Li Yong Jan 16 '17 at 9:42
5

You said it

is an idiom which means "I completely agree with you" or "I could not have said it any better".

I am not familiar with the story line, but presumably Mr Potato Head had complained about being stuck in the attic, but after being abused but the kids in Sunnyside care, Mr Potato Head is reconsidering what he said and being in the attic looks like a better alternative.

Hamm is agreeing that being in the attic would be better than being abused by the kids.

There is a saying that goes with this scenario

Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.