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I want to explain my results. So I use a figure to explain an erroneous result. Here my idea is to tell, because of missing of a specific segment (say segment 8), I got the wrong result. Assume, I have shown p1, p2 and segment 8 in the figure. And I have written it as;

For example, in Fig. 15 the corner p1 is incorrectly fixed to the corner p2 due to missing segment 8.

I have some doubts of the usage of correct prepositions, If I specifically referring to the figure, then can I use THE as I used in above sentence?

However, I think I should use as instead of to and also of in front of segment.

For example, in Fig. 15 the corner p1 is incorrectly fixed as the corner p2 due to missing of segment 8.

So, please give your comments on this. thanks

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    What is wrong is not just the prepositions: "... due to the missing segment 8". And in a technical paper, I would use a different verb than "fixed" here: "fixed to" → "connected to" or "fixed as" → "identified with". – Peter Shor Oct 23 '13 at 12:58
  • @Peter Shor: thanks for the comments. what about this part ...the corner p1 is incorrectly fixed as the corner p2 ... – gnp Oct 23 '13 at 13:03
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    The problem is that "fixed to" and "fixed as" are both reasonably grammatical here, but mean different things, and I don't know which one you want to say. – Peter Shor Oct 23 '13 at 13:04
  • @Peter: I'd say the "fixed as" usage is effectively figurative (some "real-world" phenomenon is effectively being tied to some particular word/classification). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Oct 23 '13 at 18:18
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    @PeterShor is right. To expound a bit, to say that corner p1 is fixed as corner p2 means that corner p1 and p2 are the same corner, but saying corner p1 is fixed to [the] corner p2 means that p1 is attached or connected to p2 permanently. – Jim Oct 24 '13 at 3:44
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For example, in Fig. 15 the corner p1 is incorrectly fixed to the corner p2 due to missing segment 8.

I think that could use a few extra prepositions. Unless the entire name of these pieces are corner p1 and corner p2 you need of between them. In that case, it signals that they belong to or are a part of p1 and p2.

Are you trying to say this?:

For example, in Fig. 15, the corner of p1 is incorrectly attached to the corner of p2 due to the missing segment 8.

If so, then you definitely need of in the above locations. You also need the before missing unless you revise it. As for the verb, fixed to is fine. It's a phrasal verb though, meaning that the preposition to following fixed is not optional; it's a verb phrase that changes the meaning slightly.

With the verb phrase fixed as, it means set in place. I realize that doesn't sound much different, but fixed as means that it's more permanent

It might be better to choose a different verb altogether for clarity. Attached or fastened would be more concise, but that's optional. Fixed to is synonymous with those verbs.

I have some doubts of the usage of correct prepositions, If I specifically referring to the figure, then can I use THE as I used in above sentence?

Yes, you can use the; however, the is a definite article, not a preposition,

However, I think I should use as instead of to and also of in front of segment.

For example, in Fig. 15, the corner [of] p1 is incorrectly fixed as to the corner [of] p2 due to the missing of segment 8.

No, as I said above, you cannot use fixed as here. Depending on what you're trying to articulate, you might be able to add of before segment 8, but you cannot do that as written. And I think it's more concise without it.

For example, these are much more clear:

For example, in Fig. 15, the corner [of] p1 is incorrectly fixed to the corner [of] p2, as segment 8 is missing.

For example, in Fig. 15, the corner [of] p1 is incorrectly fastened the corner [of] p2, due to segment 8 being missing. (awkward)

For example, in Fig. 15, the corner [of] p1 is incorrectly attached to the corner [of] p2 because segment 8 was not properly attached first/beforehand.

Due to, as, and because are all synonymous in the context above.

To give you a couple of examples using of before segment 8, it would look more like this:

For example, in Fig. 15, the [of] corner p1 is incorrectly fixed to the corner [of] p2, due to the absence of segment.

For example, in Fig. 15, the corner [of] p1 is incorrectly fixed to the corner [of] p2, due to the missing portion of segment 8.

  • +1 I wonder, however, if OP may not be using fixed as in the sense "firmly identified as" - as, for instance, it is used here. This, like the user's other questions, appears to deal with mathematically identifying entities on photographs. – StoneyB on hiatus Dec 14 '13 at 23:35
  • @StoneyB That's a great point. So while I've interpreted fixed to as meaning something akin to number two here, if I understand you correctly, you think that it just as well could be numbers 3 or 4 (i.e. the only thing obvious is that the verb is transitive) And honestly, I don't think that understanding the precise nature of the action itself is 100% necessary to nail down the syntax. By and large, I think that numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 are all used with the same basic syntax. – Giambattista Dec 15 '13 at 19:40

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