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I am not sure about the words written in bold. What are the correct versions?

  • The letter from / of August 23, 1885 did not bring anything new.

  • The issue / number for / from / of January 15, 1892 of the Horseless Age shows a funny picture at/on page 12.

  • I have seen that plane in L'Aerophile / the Aerophile / the L'Aerophile for / from / of May 1/1st, 1906.

Do all publications need a "the" in front of their names even if they are in foreign languages and already have a definite article in front of the title or at the end like in "Filmul" where ul=the.

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My preferred options are:

The letter of August 23, 1885 did not bring anything new.

The issue of January 15, 1892 of the Horseless Age shows a funny picture on page 12. (but I would more likely say "The January 15, 1892 issue of the Horseless Age shows a funny picture on page 12." And "number" is a perfectly good synonym for "issue", although I prefer "issue" -- perhaps if I were American, not Australian, I might prefer "number"!)

I have seen that plane in L'Aerophile / the Aerophile of May 1, 1906. ("May 1st" is also possible, but I prefer the simpler form.)

As for "the" before a title where the title contains an article in the original language -- NO. And while we are on this topic, if the title actually contains the word "the", then include this within any quotes , as "The New York Times" but the "New York Telegraph". I speak here as a qualified university librarian who has had to deal with this question for years!

By the way, in a similar vein, a couple of geographic names that annoy me, even though they are in very common use, are "the Sahara Desert", and "the Gobi Desert" -- "Sahara" and "Gobi" both mean "desert", so I prefer "the Sahara" and "the Gobi" -- but perhaps I'm just being pedantic!

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  1. The letter from / of August 23, 1885 did not bring anything new.

It is appropriate to use the word "dated" here.

The letter dated August 23, 1885 did not bring anything new.

  1. The issue / number for / from / of January 15, 1892 of the Horseless Age shows a funny picture at/on page 12.

It is best to rephrase it this way:

The January 15, 1892 issue of the Horseless Age shows a funny picture on page 12.

"ON" is used to specify the page where an item is located in a paginated resource (however, note that "on" may also be used for non-numeric pages. i.e., "on the last page".

Use "AT" if you want to indicate a specific part of a page. i.e., "... a funny picture at the upper left side of page 12."

In relation to item no. 3, I think that it is best to post it on an appropriate writing site.

Also note that you should ask one question at a time.

  • Here is a small problem I have. My text contains so many "The January 15, 1892 issue of" that I would like, if possible, to use slight variations as a kind of synonyms to avoid repeating the same string of letters more than 50 times. – Robert Werner Jan 18 '17 at 4:18
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    Don't know how you are citing your references, but if you are referencing the same publication multiple times, reference it in full the first time, then use 'op cit.' for all subsequent instances -- it is an abbreviation of the Latin phrase 'opus citatum' (the work previously cited) -- or, if the same work is referred to in consecutive references, 'ibid' ('ibidem', in the same place). This is the reference librarian in me rearing his ugly head! Check with a librarian as to the exact way to use these! – Warren Ham Jan 18 '17 at 12:46

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