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The sentence is:

The thieves stole some of Beauval Zoo’s most valued members—seven golden lion tamarins and ten silvery marmosets.

On khan academy they said that "seven golden lion tamarins and ten silvery marmosets" is an dependent clause. However, from what I read, a dependent clause requires verbs which this doesn't.

Thanks!

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    The academy is wrong. Seven golden lion tamarins and ten silvery marmosets is not a clause but a noun phrase. It's called a supplementary appositive and it refers to the preceding noun phrase some of Beauval Zoo’s most valued members. It's said to be in apposition because if it is substituted for the preceding noun phrase it yields an entailment of the original: The thieves stole seven golden lion tamarins and ten silvery marmosets. – BillJ Jan 18 '17 at 8:10
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Reference

http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/subordinateclause.htm http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/appositive.htm

The thieves stole some of Beauval Zoo’s most valued members — seven golden lion tamarins and ten silvery marmosets.

The "seven golden..." part is definitely not a dependent clause (subordinate clause). The "seven golden..." part of the sentence renames the noun "most valued members" and so is a noun phrase or an appositive.

If the sentence read "After the thieves stole..." then that first part of the sentence would be a dependent clause.

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