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Is it correct to use "for which" in this sentence:

I gave some money to a beggar for which he was casting around.

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The sentence as you have written it is not incorrect. However, to my American ear it sounds a little awkward. This is a case where ending a sentence with a preposition sounds more natural to my ear, so I might write it this way:

I gave some money to a beggar, which is what he was casting around for.

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  • Why not " I gave some money to a beggar (which/who was - identifying, without preceding comma) casitng around fot it"? Although I'm not sure the phrasal verb "cast around" - meaning "search anxiously" - is a synonym for the verbs "ask", "beg" or "panhandle". – Victor B. Jan 20 '17 at 14:15
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Ignoring the fact that that sounds like either an artificial construct or a result of poor teaching, if you must start from there why would you not use

‘I gave a beggar some money, for which he was casting around’ or better

‘I gave a beggar some money, which he was casting around for’?

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