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At the performance attended many important people and graduates.

Is this sentence corrrect?

It seems very similar to:

  • At the performance were many important people and graduates.

This last sentence seems to be ok.

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  • What about this do you think might be wrong? We don't do proofreading here, but if you offer more detail on why this is difficult, we can answer any questions.
    – Andrew
    Jan 19, 2017 at 23:42

2 Answers 2

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edit for the updated question

I don't think that your example with "were" is technically ungrammatical, it just sounds kind of funny.

At the performance were many important people and graduates.

Is almost correct. It should be

At the performance, there were many important people and graduates.

with a comma after "performance" just to visually separate the two parts of the sentence. You can think of it as two statements

At the performance

You've described the situation first, which is fine. Then you want to say something about the performance:

There were many important people

Notice that you can switch the order of the two statements and nothing changes but where your emphasis is:

There were many important people at the performance

You could also say

Many important people and graduates were at the performance.

In this example you've changed your emphasis to the people, rather than the performance, but it means the same thing.

A simpler example:

There is a dog in my house

or

A dog is in my house

They mean the same thing


As for "attended", it doesn't work because you're using a verb to describe some action, rather than using "is/there is" to describe a state of being. They just follow different rules.

You could say

Many important people attended the performance

or if you want to stick with putting the performance first,

The performance was attended by many important people

The difference is that in the first example, you're putting the thing doing the verb first. That is, the people are doing the action of "attending". In the second example you're putting the performance first, and then describing who attended it.

They mean the same thing, but the second example is in the passive voice, and it changes the tone slightly.

For example:

The dog bit me

I was bitten by the dog

The second is in the passive voice, and sounds much more... like it wasn't an important event. The first one is more immediate, "It bit me!"

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No.

"Attend" takes the event as a direct object, so it can be fronted by making the verb passive

Many people attended the performance.

->

The performance was attended by many people.

but there is no "at" phrase which can be fronted.

This is different from "be", which does not take a direct object for this meaning, but a prepositional phrase. These can be fronted:

Many people were at the performance.

->

At the performance were many people.

As Joe Pinsonault says, "At the performance, there were many people" is also common; but unlike him I don't find anything wrong with the sentence without "there".

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