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I know how going to is used in a sentence. However, whenever it's mixed with come, I get confused. The answer here has some clarifications.

However, my specific question is, do the following two sentences mean exactly the same thing? Also, which one is more grammatically correct (especially in formal writing)?

  1. I'm going to come to your house as soon as the work in hand is done.

  2. I'm coming to your house as soon as the work in hand is done.

or should I just use plain will:

I'll come to your house as soon as the work in hand is done.

The reason I'm reluctant to use will is because it sounds more in the future than I intend to.

  • They don't quite mean the same thing. The first sentence is undoubtedly in the future tense, specifically because it uses the future form "going to". However, the second sentence, "I'm coming to" doesn't necessarily denote a future event at all, as the person talking could be coming to your house as we speak! – MadGab Jan 22 '17 at 1:25
  • Of course. The point is present continuous used not as present continuous per se but as a future. Obviously, it's also: He speaks French versus He's speaking French. – Lambie Jan 22 '17 at 14:25
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in your case you can use several different ways to talk about the future:

1. Present Continuous + time word:

I'm coming to your house today.

This form used to talk about plans which are already arranged for a particular time in the future. and it is used very often with come and go and with verbs like visit, meet, etc ...

2. BE + Going to:

I'm going to come to your house today.

Be going to can also be used to express the same idea; however, it puts an extra emphasis on the idea of intention.

3. Will:

I'll come to your house today.

This form used to talk about things that we decide to do now.

Note: At the moment of making a decision, use 'will'. Once you have made the decision, talk about it using 'going to'. and if it has arranged talk about it using 'Present Continuous + time word'

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The short answer is yes, the first two mean exactly the same thing.   * But see note below.

Corrected versions:

  1. I'm going to go over to your house as soon as the work is done.
    (Future action expressed with “going to”)
  2. I'm going over to your house as soon as the work is done.
    (Future action expressed with present continuous)

Note: It's go to someone's house; a speaker goes away from the location where he or she is at the time of speaking.  See When to use “come” & when to use “go”?, Confused by “come” vs “go”, and related questions.

They are both grammatically correct; what was not correct was come instead of go.

Will is more for intention: [on the phone]

Stop bugging me, John. I'll come over then when I finish my work.

Will shows intention or an offer to do something (right away or at a later date).

I'll open the window, it's hot in here.

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    But what if it is in a conversation? Like person-1: Come to my house tonight. Person-2: Yeah, I'm coming [to your house] as soon as ... – Fayaz Jan 22 '17 at 3:39
  • Technically, Person 1 says coming. So Person 2 can answer coming, though technically, Person 2 is actually going. – Lambie Jan 22 '17 at 14:23
  • @Lambie I understand that using 'go' instead of 'come' improves the meaning or readability of the sentence. However, is it grammatically wrong? – Scott Jan 24 '17 at 23:34

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