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Consider:

To enhance insight on the ionic liquid structure, RDFs due to correlations between atomic sites on each ion were calculated.

I guess "due to" means "resulted from" here. Does it have such a meaning? Here, we have one clause. Should we expect a second clause whenever a "due to" is used?

This is another question with similar title but the contents of the question and answer don't deal with "due to" as expected here.

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  • "due to" means "according to" or "because of". Your sentence sounds off to me. Jan 24 '17 at 7:45
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    Possible duplicate of object complement after "due to" Jan 24 '17 at 9:18
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    insight into... Jan 24 '17 at 11:43
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    resulting from would be better here than due to. Jan 24 '17 at 11:43
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    The answer to other question covers other things and I don't think they are the same.
    – Ahmad
    Jan 24 '17 at 13:00
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"due to" has many meaning one of which is "ascribable to". The following sentence reads as follows:

  • To enhance insight on the ionic liquid structure, radial distribution functions (RDFs) ascribable to correlations between atomic sites on each ion were calculated.

For those who can't see the meaning:

  • Ascribe/Ascribable - to regard as arising from a specified cause or source; capable of being assigned or credited to
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This doesn't sound quite right ... but the truth is if I read it in a scientific journal I would accept it as a new kind of jargon. It feels like shorthand for "that occur as a result of ..." or something similar. I'm not quite sure how the RDFs get produced so I don't know the exact verb to use.

Anyway, if you read this in a journal follow the basic rule: Imitate others.

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