2

Does this sentence make sense? Or should I use 'of' instead of 'from'?

Also moved to Lake George last year and only 5 minutes of walking distance from the public beach.

2

It's possible to use either of or from, but there is a specific structure for both options. One can be walking distance from somewhere, or alternatively, within walking distance of somewhere.

To paraphrase your example:

  • I moved to Lake George last year and now I'm only 5 minutes walking distance from the public beach.

  • I moved to Lake George last year and now I'm within 5 minutes walking distance of the public beach.

As an aside, the also at the beginning of the sentence seems out of place - one would expect the sentence to begin with I also..., presuming some other element of conversation preceded this sentence. Similarly with only - I'd expect a pronoun of some sort beforehand.

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  • Thank you for your answer! Seems like I have been making mistakes for a while now by skipping pronouns in my sentences. – RomZes13 Jan 24 '17 at 14:35
  • @RomZes13: Idiomatically, there are many contexts where native speakers often discard an initial personal pronoun (particularly, I). But I suspect learners in particular are likely to "overuse" the form because it's so common on Internet social media / chat sites (where posts are often automatically preceded by the poster's username, which can be interpreted as the subject of the following verb, as in FumbleFingers <rolls eyes>, for example, where I'd only have actually typed the last two words). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jan 24 '17 at 14:58
1

The idiom is "five minutes' walking distance from the beach" (not everybody would write the possessive apostrophe, but careful writers would). No 'of'. "To the public beach" would be possible as well, but "from" seems more natural to me.

On a different subject, I find the "and" strange here because the implied subject of the first half is "I" or "we" and of the second half is where we live. I'd write

Also moved to Lake George last year, and it's only 5 minutes' walking distance from the public beach.

or

Also moved to Lake George last year: only 5 minutes' walking distance from the public beach.

The "also" reads a bit oddly too, but that might depend on what comes before.

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