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I learned "remember to" means "don't forget to" but it is only used in future or present things. For example, "I will remember to mail these letters." means "I will not forget to mail these letters.)

But when they become past tense, I hear that "I remembered to mail these letters." doesn't mean "I didn't forget to mail these letters". Is this right? Does "I remembered to mail these letters." mean "I remembered that I mailed these letters" or other? Could you teach me?

I know the difference between "remember to" and "remember ~ing". I asked the difference between "remember to " and "remembered to" because I hear the meaning change beside it become past.

marked as duplicate by StoneyB, Community Jan 26 '17 at 4:30

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No, it means the same in all tenses.

"I will remember to mail the letters" = I will not forget to mail the letters.

"I remember to mail the letters" = I habitually do not forget to mail the letters.

"I remembered to mail the letters" = I did not forget to mail the letters.

  • Thank you for your answer. "I remembered to put a pen in my bag" and "I didn't forget to put a pen in my bag" are the same meaning, aren't they? – Yuuichi Tam Jan 26 '17 at 5:17
  • Essentially. Most people would say the first one, though. – Curtis White Jan 26 '17 at 5:28

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