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I was wondering it, let's fancy this situation: A singer is performing a song on a stage, and the stage is 3 meters higher than the audience (where people are on, seeing him perform the song), the singer is pulled down by a fan who was watching him. So, how could I differ: being pulled from the stage where he was performing the song and being pulled from the audience by a fan? If I said: He was pulled from the audience - Someone could possible understand that he was performing on the audience and someone pulled him down from there. But I actually implied to say that He was pulled down from the audience (Someone who was in the audience pulled him down). So, given the information, how could I differ both?

The singer was pulled from the audience - He was pulled by someone who was in the audience, but he wasn't in the audience, he was on the stage.

The singer was pulled from the audience - He was on the audience, performing from there, and someone pulled him down from that place, i.e.: someone who wasn't on the audience, pulled him down from there (there = the audience)

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    In the situation you're describing, the singer was pulled BY (someone) from the audience not FROM the audience. "The singer was pulled from the audience" cannot mean the singer was on stage before that. – P. O. Jan 25 '17 at 18:32
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    'the singer was pulled -into- the audience', or 'the singer was pulled -up from- the audience' would solve your problem. 'into' and 'up' simple as that – Tom22 Jan 25 '17 at 20:53
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    I suggested using "to" to remove the ambiguities of using "from" – Tom22 Jan 25 '17 at 22:59
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    Your examples in your newest comment could work but were moving into proofreading now ... and style issues. they are wordy and still awkward – Tom22 Jan 25 '17 at 23:01
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    Let us continue this discussion in chat. – Tom22 Jan 25 '17 at 23:06
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The way you are phrasing this implies that the singer was previously on top of or in the audience, and someone pulled him down from there. Specifically the word 'from' is the problem here, as it indicates the original position of the singer. You could say 'The singer was pulled down from the stage by someone from the audience,' or you could say 'The singer was pulled by the audience from the stage.' You could even say 'A hand from the audience pulled the singer down from the stage.' However you would like to phrase it, you cannot say he was pulled from the audience and have the meaning you would like.

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  • Yes, Cameron, I was aware of all these secondary ways to phrase it, but I thought there were other ways to say it. – Haseo Jan 25 '17 at 18:06

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