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I know that

"is gone"

can be translated to both "dead" and really "departed" and in most cases I can understand that when I know the context. But sometimes even when I know the context I have hard times defining it. Is there any way to determine that?

i.e: I've started a movie right in the middle, a man was in a hurry to go to someones house from the bus station and when he arrived a girl (a common friend apparently) said: Sorry, she is gone.

I knew the context, but I didn't know the history so I guessed that she had to be dead, but after 10 minutes I understand that she's moved to another country :|

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    For what it's worth, departed is also a euphemism for died, as in set phrases like the dearly departed and the faithful departed (traditional translation of fidelium animae defunctorum).
    – choster
    Commented Jan 26, 2017 at 16:58
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    This is sometimes ambiguous even to native speakers, and this ambiguity can be used intentionally by scriptwriters to confuse the characters and/or the audience. There's even a trope.
    – 1006a
    Commented Jan 26, 2017 at 17:03
  • If you didn't know the history, you didn't know the full context. But since movement is clear at the time of the statement, I would go with "departed" (went somewhere else). But "departed" is usually used in the case of scheduled travel, so using "left" would be more likely.
    – user3169
    Commented Jan 26, 2017 at 21:07

1 Answer 1

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"She's gone", has to be in context to make sense. You just found that out!

It could mean: She could not wait and left before you arrived.

It could mean: She has left your relationship.

It could mean: She's dead.

It could mean: She left the building/country/city -- any place.

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    Unless there were a lot of people standing around looking sad, "she's dead" would not be my first interpretation. It's more common to mean simply "she isn't here."
    – Andrew
    Commented Jan 26, 2017 at 16:55

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