1

You will come to my party tomorrow, will you?
Options:
1) isn't it?
2) will not you?
3) won't you?
4) No improvement

If it's "won't you", can someone please set examples?

0

"Won't" is a contraction for "will not." "Won't" is used quite commonly in spoken English. "Will you not" is much more formal, and has been preferred in written English, although "won't you" is usually used in casual writing (such as in writing a note to a friend or relative).

Difference between "won't" and "will not"


The acceptable choices here are:

Will you come to my party tomorrow?

^ This may just be a simple question, with the speaker/writer asking whether someone is planning to come to the party. (Or, depending on the circumstances, this sentence could be used by a speaker/writer to ask the other person to come to the party.)

Will you please come to my party tomorrow? (or) Will you come to my party tomorrow, please?

^ Adding "please" turns the question into a clear request.

Won't you come to my party tomorrow?

^ This is both a question and a definite request, as is true of all of the rest of the choices. They would be used when the speaker/writer wants to indicate that he or she will feel disappointed if the person does not come to the party. "Won't you" or "will you not" are sometimes used to slightly imply that the speaker/writer is expecting that the person might refuse (or decline) to do what they are being asked to do.

The request becomes even more emphatic if "please" is added:

Won't you please come to my party tomorrow? (or) Won't you come to my party tomorrow, please?

.

You will come to my party tomorrow, won't you?

^ When spoken, the word "will" is stressed here. (However, this sentence could also be written. The italic format is not necessary; I have added it for the sake of this discussion.) As with "Won't you come to my party tomorrow?", someone would use this expression to indicate that he or she will feel disappointed if the person does not come to the party.

You will come to my party tomorrow, will you not?

^ This is very formal and rarely used in modern English. (Again, if spoken, the word "will" would be emphasized. If written, the italic format shown here would not be necessary.)


A line from a popular children's song that is sung at Christmas goes:

Rudolph, with your nose so bright, won't you guide my sleigh tonight?

The speaker (Santa Claus) is not just asking Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer if Rudolph will lead the team of reindeer pulling Santa's sleigh; Santa Claus is also communicating that he will feel disappointed if Rudolph says, "No."

  • Good answer, but won't is a contraction of "will not", not "will you not". – user42526 Jan 27 '17 at 10:58
  • Good point. I was referring to its use in this specific situation. – user48167 Jan 27 '17 at 11:01

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