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can we re-write "all day and all night" to be "all day and night"

No one speaks and the DVD player runs all day and all night. Adventures in Europe and Central America

No one speaks and the DVD player runs all day and night.

  • Usually, one says: all day and all night. That is the idiom. – Lambie Jan 28 '17 at 18:08
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    @Lambie - I must disagree; they're both quite common. – stangdon Jan 28 '17 at 18:18
  • @stangdon which is better to use with the above example? – Shannak Jan 30 '17 at 18:20
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No one speaks and the DVD player runs all day and night.

That is not quite as clear as all day and all night, but probably would be understood. On Edit: all day and all night is an idiom in common usage.

I'd suggest.

No one speaks and the DVD player runs night and day.

night and day is a common idiom that means continuously (added On Edit.)

I can't tell you why, but this is far more clear than all day and night..

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    The difference is not clarity. The difference between them is the context in which they would be used. One is a quasi-idiomatic expression whereas the other (all day and night) would be used in a technical or non-expressive, "non-poetic" context. – Lambie Jan 28 '17 at 18:46

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