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I saw the sentence "People with diabetes are prone to infections".

I've checked in the dictionaries (see attached picture) and it's written there that the meaning of "prone to" is "having a tendency to...".

I'd like to know if it's possible to put a verb after the preposition "to" of "prone to" (as happens with "tend to do..." )or it's possible to put noun only as in the sentence above ("to infections")

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You can use both verbs and nouns.

...prone to jump

...prone to disease

It simply matters that the verb or noun used makes sense given the context.

  • Thank you^, but I didn't understand the last sentence "It simply matters that the verb or noun used makes sense given the context." and I would like you to clarify it. – Judicious Allure Jan 29 '17 at 18:10
  • I means that the verb or noun you chose should be appropriate to what you're talking about. – Curtis White Jan 29 '17 at 18:55
  • This thing I understood, and that's right always to any situation in any language. Maybe you can explain or give an example why did you choose to say it here in my case here, this is the thing that I missed. Thank you – Judicious Allure Jan 29 '17 at 19:05

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