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As stated above, when do I use "do" in sentences? Examples:

You bring your laptop tomorrow.
You do bring your laptop tomorrow.

You walk for two hundred meters, then you turn left.
You walk for two hundred meters, then you do turn left.

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    You'd only use 'do' for emphasis. If someone asked you "My friend says we should have taken the last turning on the right to get to the the station, but I think we should turn left here. Is either of us right?" you might say "No. You walk on for two hundred meters, then you do turn left." But you would not use this in answer to the question "Please could you tell us how to get to the station?" – Edwin Ashworth Jan 30 '17 at 5:25
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Only if it is the emphasised word. Normally, an auxiliary is not used in simple present. Just use the action verb by itself.

[you] Bring your laptop tomorrow.
You walk for two hundred meters, then you turn left.

Your first example of “you do your laptop tomorrow.” used do instead of the verb. Was that a mistake typing it?

The only reason do would appear is to show that a different auxilary is not in that slot, as a response to someone asking “I don’t bring it tomorrow?” — “You do bring it tomorrow.”. It appears only so it may be stressed.

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"Do" as an Auxiliary Verb is used in many occasions: To ask questions, to create negatives, to emphasize the idea of the main verb, to avoid repetition of the main verb, etc.

E.g.: (You bring your laptop tomorrow)

  • Do you bring your laptop tomorrow?
  • (You) Don't bring your laptop tomorrow.
  • You do bring your laptop tomorrow.
  • You never bring your laptop, but I do.
  • That’s very interesting, considering sentence structures other than the OP’s examples, giving a more complete survey of the aux verb usage. – JDługosz Feb 2 '17 at 8:34

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