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Does “Keep on” and “keep as it is” have same meaning? When and where we can use these?

For example: I have to tell my friend to keep a thing as in the same way

I think it is better to keep as it is.

Is my usage correct?

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    Could you provide a couple of example sentences which use these phrases? Oct 30, 2013 at 13:10
  • To echo Steve's thoughts, this question could sure use some improvements. For starters, the phrase keep on has at least five possible meanings – which ones don't you understand and are therefore asking about? As for where can you use them, there are a host of possibilities, such as "They had very fancy china plates they would keep on the hutch." For more information and ideas about asking good questions, look here.
    – J.R.
    Oct 30, 2013 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

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Keep on is a phrasal verb taking a gerund clause as its complement; it means “continue [a course of action]”. It is an intensive version of plain keep in this sense.

Bob kept on interrupting me, so I couldn't finish. ... Bob continued to interrupt me
Laura kept on writing until the chapter was done. ... Laura continued to write

It often has the sense of “persevere”, as in the 60s-70s catchphrase

Keep on keeping on. ... Don't give up the struggle to achieve/survive

Keep ... as it is is not a fixed phrase but the transitive verb keep, meaning “maintain [something] [in a specified condition]” combined with the phrase as it is serving as the second complement with the meaning “in its present condition”.

Ryan wanted to change the second sentence, but we decided to keep it as it was.
Let's keep the schedule as it is for now. We can update it when we know more.

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You asked about:

I think it is better to keep as it is.

I would add one word:

I think it is better to keep it as it is.

Alternatively, you can say:

I think it is better to keep things as they are.

The word things can be used if you are talking about a situation or arrangement (even if you are only talking about one "thing"):

Cindy: Right now, we meet for lunch every other Tuesday. Do you want to move that to Thursday?
Mindy: I think it would be better to keep things as they are.

As for keep on, that could be used in a similar context, but I would be less vague when using keep on, avoiding words like "things" and "it":

Sandy: Right now, we meet for lunch every other Tuesday. Do you want to move that to Thursday?
Mandy: I think it would be better to keep on meeting on Tuesdays.

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