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  1. A great approach base on statistical analysis which cause "to reducing" the number of experiments, "evaluating" relationship between variables, "creating" empirical model and finally "specifying" the optimum response of experiment.

  2. A great approach base on statistical analysis which cause "to reducing" the number of experiments,"to evaluating" relationship between variables,"to creating" empirical model and finally "to specifying" the optimum response of experiment.

Which one sounds grammatically and stylistically better?

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Glorfindel, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩, Rompey, LMS Jan 31 '17 at 18:26

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  • 1
    Sorry, but this is Off Topic proofreading. Note that you need based, not base, but to be honest I simply don't understand what the rest of the "sentence" is supposed to mean. Certainly neither version is grammatically valid. – FumbleFingers Jan 31 '17 at 15:15
  • Also note that whatever you're trying to say here, your text can only be a noun phrase, not a valid sentence as normally defined. Sentences are normally expected to contain a primary verb, but all you have is the noun "[a great] approach" qualified by a string of adverbial clauses. – FumbleFingers Jan 31 '17 at 15:25
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As Fumblefingers points out, this is not actually a sentence, but just a very long noun phrase: you have a noun ("a great approach") qualified by a string of adverbial clauses, but not a subject-verb-object. If you want it to be a complete sentence, you could tack on a subject and verb at the beginning, and have the phrase be the object: "This is a great approach...."

Besides that, neither version is anywhere near correct. You already have cause as the main verb of your adverbial phrase, so you need a series of direct objects for it, which are noun phrases; you can't shovel in a bunch of to-infinitive-based clauses that don't even use the infinitive form.

You have two main choices for fixing the phrase:

1: convert all of your "to-whatever" into noun forms:

A great approach based on statistical analysis which causes a reduction in the number of experiments, an evaluation of the relationships between variables, creation of an empirical model and finally a specification for the optimum response of the experiment.

2: remove the verb cause and use the rest of the phrases as parallel verb-phrases:

A great approach based on statistical analysis which reduces the number of experiments, evaluates relationships between variables, creates an empirical model, and finally specifies the optimum response of the experiment.

  • Well, at least you managed to make sense of the original text! But I think with such a complex noun phrase it's worth pointing out that it really is just a noun phrase (i.e. - it's not a "sentence"). Easily fixed by prefacing with a suitable subject and verb, such as I created... – FumbleFingers Jan 31 '17 at 15:31
  • @FumbleFingers true. I made a few tweaks that I hope clarify the situation. :-) – Hellion Jan 31 '17 at 15:40
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    It's fairly easy to imagine contexts where native speakers wouldn't notice the lack of a subject & verb. For example, a comparison between different "approaches", each of which is identified by name in its review section (where semantically, we'd parse it as being introduced by an implicit The above-named approach is...), But I honestly have no idea how obvious that is to learners, nor do I know whether the lack of any such valid subject+verb would significantly affect a learner's ability to parse the text (it certainly made it more difficult for me, since I "expected" one! :) – FumbleFingers Jan 31 '17 at 15:55

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