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This is a passage quoted from the article Moderate exercise not only treats, but prevents depression:

Mammen acknowledges that other factors influence a person’s likelihood of experiencing depression, including their genetic makeup. But he says that the scope of research he assessed demonstrates that regardless of individual predispositions, there’s a clear take-away for everyone. “It’s definitely worth taking note that if you’re currently active, you should sustain it. If you’re not physically active, you should initiate the habit. This review shows promising evidence that the impact of being active goes far beyond the physical.”

What does take-away mentioned in this passage mean? I've looked it up, but couldn't find a definition for it.

  • People also say take-away lesson, take-home, and take-home lesson with the same meaning. – snailcar Nov 2 '13 at 23:15
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First off you have to get that this take-away is literally a noun (from the word a preceding it).

Oxford says that take-away as a noun means:

A key fact, point, or idea to be remembered, typically one emerging from a discussion or meeting.

Rephrase, the clear take-away (the key fact, the point) meant in the passage above is this:

"It's definitely worth taking note that if you're currently active, you should sustain it. If you're not physically active, you should initiate the habit. This review shows promising evidence that the impact of being active goes far beyond the physical."

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    And that key fact is called a take-away because you literally are supposed to take it away with you from the meeting or presentation. – Jim Nov 2 '13 at 23:14
  • Great reasoning, (y) – Safira Nov 2 '13 at 23:24

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