3

Which is correct? For example:

That can have long-run benefits.

or

That can have long run benefits.

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    I think the word you're looking for is long-term. We refer to long-term benefits or long-term goals. Long run would make more sense like this: I know it seems difficult now, but these changes will make things better in the long run.
    – WendiKidd
    Nov 3 '13 at 22:59
  • @WendiKidd long-term or long-terms or long-terms' or long-term's ? Nov 3 '13 at 23:00
  • Long-term is hyphenated because it's a compound adjective. The long run is not; I'm pretty sure it's a noun phrase.
    – WendiKidd
    Nov 3 '13 at 23:01
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I think the word you're looking for is long-term. We refer to long-term benefits or long-term goals. Long run would make more sense like this:

I know it seems difficult now, but these changes will make things better in the long run.

Long-term is hyphenated because it's a compound adjective. The long run is not; I'm pretty sure it's a noun phrase.

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    The noun phrase long run can be used as a compound adjective by adding a hyphen, just like long term.
    – Ben Kovitz
    Oct 5 '15 at 23:45

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