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I listened this song written by David Edward & Daniel Freeman. I like that song but I didn't get complete meaning as I don't know the use of "You's" in lyrics. Lyrics is as below:

I used to be lunatic from the gracious days
I used to be woebegone and so restless nights
My aching heart would bleed for you to see
Oh but now
(I don't find myself bouncing round whistling
and fortunes to make me cry)
No more "I love you's"
The language is leaving me
No more "I love you's"
Changes are shifting outside the word
(The lover speaks about the monsters)
I used to have demons in my room at night
Desire,despair,desire,so many monsters
Oh but now
(I don't find myself bouncing round whistling
and fortunes to make me cry)

No more "I love you's"
The language is leaving me
No more "I love you's"
The language is leaving me in silence
No more "I love you's"
Changes are shifting outside the word

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    The transcription is slightly wrong, making it more confusing. It should be No more "I love you"s - that is "No more statements of 'I love you'." – stangdon Feb 9 '17 at 13:43
  • Ohh..!! I didn't get that side too!! Thanks @stangdon – Shaunak Shukla Feb 9 '17 at 13:59
14

The statement in the song is analogous to "no more hellos" where the word "hello", used in greeting, has become the name for such a greeting. It has become nominalized.

We say our hellos and our goodbyes.

The phrase "I love you" is similarly being turned into a noun that stands for the profession of love, and the noun is being pluralized.

No more I love yous.

  • Logically, it should be written: 'No more "I love you"s' But I'm not aware of any style guide that actually says that. – Monty Harder Feb 9 '17 at 15:58
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    @Monty I wonder if it wouldn't make more sense to treat it like a compound and write I-love-yous. – ColleenV parted ways Feb 9 '17 at 16:49
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    @MontyHarder You're right, because in "I love you's" the apostrophe neither indicates a contraction not is it used suitable to indicticate a possession. – bye Feb 9 '17 at 17:20
  • Logically, Monty is right, but I think the way it is written in the answer (no quotation marks or apostrophe) is the usual style. – David K Feb 9 '17 at 20:19
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    I love yous is a nominal, pluralized. How we represent that grammatical status in typography or orthography is a matter of (mere) convention. Hyphens between the elements is certainly a way to go. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 9 '17 at 21:29

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