1

In one text I found this sentence

I just find it boring.

I know the verb 'to find' has many meanings, but in this example I do not understand why the subject I is before find. Can I say the sentence as:

It finds me boring.

What is first? What find who .... or who find what ... ?

Are these examples correct:

  1. She finds me pretty.
  2. She finds me she is a pretty girl.
  3. It finds me my work is very boring.
  4. I find them I am a bad guy.

Can you write me some examples, please?

Thanks for help.

1

I just find it boring.

This is just a standard transitive verb, with "I" as the subject and "it" as the object. In this use, "find" is defined as:

a : to discover by the intellect or the feelings : experience (ex: find much pleasure in your company)

So basically, the person in your sentence "finds" it, or "experiences" it, as boring.

Are these examples correct:

  • She finds me pretty. = OK
  • She finds me she is a pretty girl. = NOT OK
  • It finds me my work is very boring. = NOT OK
  • I find them I am a bad guy. = NOT OK

Some similar sentences using "find" properly:

  • She finds me a pretty girl. (One girl finds the speaker attractive)
  • I find my work is very boring. (My experience is that my work is boring)
  • They find me a bad guy. (They think the speaker is a bad person). Note it's not often you would write about others finding you to be a certain way. It would be more natural to say "They think I am a bad guy", "They believe I am a bad guy", or "They take me as a bad guy".
  • Tell me whether I understood it. 1) He finds she is a pretty girl. 2) She finds he is a handsome guy. 3) She finds him a pretty girl. 4) He finds her a handsome guy. 5) My work finds me very boring. Thanks. – Ľubomír Masarovič Feb 12 '17 at 11:48
  • 1) and 2) are ok, although it would be more natural to say "He finds her pretty." (same structure as the "I find it boring" sentence). 3) and 4) make sense if you're switching to a literal meaning of "find", meaning to locate. 5) doesn't make sense as it's written. It would be better to say "I find my work very boring" – MadGab Feb 12 '17 at 12:05
  • @ĽubomírMasarovič Boring is an active ('present') participle: boring work is work which bores you. When you are speaking of your state which results from doing boring work you use the passive ('past') participle bored: "I am bored". – StoneyB Feb 12 '17 at 14:30

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