0
  1. “I am sending you an audio which IS new to you.” Or “I am sending you an audio which IT´S new to you”

  2. “The first option IS the correct one” - or “The first option IT´S the correct one.”

  3. This war IT is going to be a very long war! OR This war is going to be a very long war!

4

The problem lies in comparing English with Spanish, or with any other language.

Some learners have the tendency to believe that their native language sets the rules and is the only one with some logic, and that all other languages are illogical because they don't follow the rules they take as the norm.

In answer to your question, if the noun or a relative pronoun referring to the noun are present, it is ungrammatical to include "it" after them. The fact that "it" has no translation in Spanish does not make it invisible. Then, the correct sentences are:

  • I am sending you an audio which is new to you. ("which" already refers to the noun "audio")

  • The first option is the correct one. (The noun "option" is there, so using "it” after it is ungrammatical. However, if you refer to that option again, you can use "it": "The first option is the correct one. In fact, it's the only one that can work in this case.")

  • This war is going to be a very long war (OR "a very long one," to avoid repeating "war"). Now, if reference needs to be made to the same war again, then you can use "it": "This war is going to be a very long one. It can last for years."

2

English word order is Subject - Verb - Object.

Subjects and objects can be nouns.

It is a pronoun - a pronoun takes the place of a noun. If the noun is there, you don't need it and it should not be there.

The first option IS the correct one

The subject in this sentence is "the first option", so you don't use it.

If we mentioned "the first option" before, we can use it in a second sentence to avoid repeating "the first option" over and over:

I looked into the first option. It is the correct one. (It = "the first option")


You can use a technique called an "appositive phrase" I think as a form of emphasis or making sure someone knows what you are talking about. A comma is needed to make it clear.

The first option, it is the correct one.

In real speech, the speaker would place emphasis on the word it, because the reason she would say this is to make sure you understand he/she means "the first option" instead of something else.


Which is a relative pronoun, so it functions as a "connector" between clauses and a pronoun in the sense above.

I am sending you an audio which IS new to you.

Which already refers to "audio" as well as links "I am sending you an audio" and "[it] is new to you" so specifying it is redundant and doesn't work.

  • The emphatic construction you are talking about in the second section of you answer can be called "left dislocation". It's not rare, but I also don't think it is extremely common in English. It is also used more in speech than in writing. – sumelic Feb 14 '17 at 1:55
1

It is not compulsory to use IT while referring to something. The correct choices would be:

  1. I am sending you an audio which IS new to you.
  2. The first option IS the correct one
  3. This war is going to be a very long war!

If you want to use IT, the the first sentence can be modified as follows:

I am sending you an audio. IT is new to you.

Use IS or WAS along with IT for present or past tense, respectively. Do not use IT without a verb. Additionally, you can use IT'S instead of IT IS.

  • To be clear (because many native speakers also make this mistake) it's means "it is" while its (without the apostrophe) is the possessive. its-not-its.info – Andrew Feb 13 '17 at 17:11
  • Thanks @Andrew for the link to the webpage. Helped me correct some misconceptions. – Nikhil Mehta Feb 13 '17 at 18:00
0

I am sending you an audio which IS new to you.

This is correct.

I am sending you an audio which IT´S new to you.

This is incorrect. This is easier to see if we simplify the contraction:

I am sending you an audio which IT IS new to you.

The word it represents the subject, and we do not repeat the subject in a simple sentence. However, if you joined two sentences, you would need it:

I am sending you an audio; it is new to you.

This is correct, as two complete sentences (each with a subject and a verb) are joined with a semicolon.

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