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I want to know the construction of the following sentence from The Great Gatsby:

The groups change more swiftly, swell with new arrivals, dissolve and form in the same breath--already there are wanderers, confident girls who weave here and there among the stouter and more stable, become for a sharp, joyous moment the center of a group and then excited with triumph glide on through the sea-change of faces and voices and color under the constantly changing light.

I can understand from 'The groups' to 'here and there'. I don't know what 'become for a sharp' and I don't know its meaning as well. I also don't understand what it means that 'excited with triumph glide on through the sea-change of faces and voices and color under the constantly changing light'. What 'excited'? And what does 'triumph glide on through' mean? Thanks,

Roki

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Under normal circumstances that sentence would be given extra punctuation to give it more structure:

The groups change more swiftly, swell with new arrivals, dissolve and form in the same breath--already there are wanderers, confident girls who weave here and there among the stouter and more stable, become (for a sharp, joyous moment) the center of a group and then, excited with triumph, glide on through the sea-change of faces and voices and color under the constantly changing light.

Now you can see that they "become the center of a group", but only briefly ("for a sharp, joyous moment" which makes them "excited with triumph") before they move on to find a new group (gliding "through the ... faces and voices...").

(Fitzgerald's lack of punctuation gives the sentence a bit more urgency, a sense of constant action that suits the chaotic nature of the scene.)

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