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I am writing a scientific paper about quantum mechanics.

In the last paragraph of my conclusion, I would like to warn the readers of the disadvantages or drawbacks of some useful method.

I find it hard to start the paragraph. I feel it is bad to start as 'Finally, we would like to warn the readers of the insufficiency of the rule'.

Can anyone give me a tip? Some examples?

  • When you say "some useful method", is it correct to infer that your paper discussed several useful methods, or was it about this one useful method in particular? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 16 '17 at 13:05
  • Just say "As a caveat..." – Chenmunka Feb 16 '17 at 13:09
  • @TRomano I discussed only one method. – John Feb 16 '17 at 13:12
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Finally, we would like to warn the readers of the insufficiency of the rule.

It sounds like you are wanting to explain a limitation that prevents the rule from being "perfect." As this is a scientific paper and honesty/knowledge is a clear and present value here, you can really just come out and literally express the limitations of your rule or knowledge.

The way you are expressing it here is fine.

Explaining why we are better off with the rule than without it might be useful as well.

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