1

You must leave the furniture as it is. you mustn't move anything.

When can we use the verb to be at the end of sentence?

UPDATE:

The verb be is used in the following patterns:

  1. with a noun:

My mother is a teacher. Bill Clinton was the president of the US.

  1. with an adjective:

This soup is very tasty. The children were good.

2.1 with the -ing form to make the continuous aspect

We were walking down the street. Everything was wet. It had been raining for hours.

2.2 with the -ed form to make the passive voice

The house was built in 1890. The street is called Montagu Street. This car was made in Japan.

  1. with a prepositional phrase:

John and his wife are from Manchester. The flowers are on the table.

British Council

In the above description, the to be verbs is followed by adjective or verb.

So, When can we use the verb to be without adjective or verb?

  • 1
    The question is too broad to answer. Please explain why and in what circumstances you think it might not be appropriate to end a sentence with "is". – Colin Fine Feb 16 '17 at 22:06
  • The question was updated. – Shannak Feb 16 '17 at 22:14
-1

When it is appropriate.

It is.

This is a correct sentence.

Is he home? Yes, he is.

These are correct sentences.

You can be here whenever I am.

This is a correct sentence. I am (here). The (here) is implied, and can be written, but it is not required.

  • Thank you, What can we put between brackets in my case. "You must leave the furniture as it is (___)" – Shannak Feb 16 '17 at 21:50
  • I misread your question. I used the parentheses to show the part of the sentence which is implied, but not written. Let me revise it to include "is" examples. – Davo Feb 16 '17 at 21:53
  • So, When can we use the verb to be without adjective or verb? All you need is a subject and a verb. I am. You are. He is. They are. – Davo Feb 21 '17 at 21:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.