1

A clause is the smallest unit of English grammar and it is made up of a subject and a verb. To have clauses, we need phrases and with the combination of two or more clauses we get sentences. Grammar Bank

in the same page there is an example:

A famous celebrity had an unfortunate accident a long time ago (first clause) when he didn't use his safety equipment (second clause) and injured his left arm severely. (third clause)

Where is the subject in the third clause?

  • 2
    Grammar Bank is wrong on just about everything, e.g. a sentence can be a single clause, for example "I am a student" has just one clause - it's a clausal sentence. The example you give has a coordination of two verb phrases functioning as predicate of the subject "he": "... he [didn't use his safety equipment] and [injured his left arm severely]. Note that the bracketed elements are not clauses but VPs (verb phrases), contrary to what Grammar Bank says. – BillJ Feb 17 '17 at 9:25
1

The subject is omitted as well as the subordinate conjunction when. Consequently, in your example, the sentence reads:

A famous celebrity had an unfortunate accident a long time ago when he didn't use his safety equipment and when he injured his left arm severely.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.