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Which one is correct and more natural? Is there difference in meaning?

  • I suggested that he should eat more vegetables.

  • I suggested that he eat more vegetables.

  • I suggested that he ate more vegetables.

Can we omit "that" word from these sentences?

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According to http://www.ef.com/english-resources/english-grammar/using-suggest/

Suggest can also be followed by that + subject + should + verb, but in these clauses both that and should may be omitted, leaving the subject directly after the verb suggest.

EXAMPLES:

  • He suggests that I should go to New York.
  • He suggests that I go to New York.
  • He suggests I should go to New York.
  • He suggests I go to New York.

The first two sound okay to me!

You can have multiple variants here:

  1. I suggested that he should eat more vegetables.
  2. I suggested that he eat more vegetables.
  3. I suggested he should eat more vegetables.
  4. I suggested he eat more vegetables.

There is no difference between the first two sentences you've given, but the third sentence definitely has a different meaning.

"I suggested that he ate more vegetables." sounds like "I suggested and he did eat more vegetables" but I'm not exactly sure about it.

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This is an example of Present Subjunctive.

You use it in a that-clause(but you can omit the that) to express an action or idea is necessary. It takes a bare infinitival(the plain form of) verb.

Verbs like recommend and suggest are usually used to indicate this form.

This contruction is generally more common in American English than British English. In British English, using should is preferable(like the first sentence)

The last sentence is correct but you don't emphasize the neccessity of eating more vegetables.

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