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There are no tanks to draw/take the water.

There are no tanks to draw the water from.

There are no tanks from which to take the water.

I want to know what is the difference between the usage of these, especially 2nd and 3rd. Another same type:

No teachers to take the result from.

No teachers from whom to take the result.

(There are has been omitted).

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    An old rule (not usually considered valid any more) is that sentences should not end in a preposition. So your last two example pairs simply restructure the sentences to form a "normal" prepositional phrase. The restructuring does not change meaning, but in some people's eyes makes them more grammatical. Peter answers your other questions.
    – RichF
    Feb 18, 2017 at 21:17
  • 1 I want to know who he is. 2 I want to know who is he. Do they mean the same thing? Which one is preferred @RichF? Feb 20, 2017 at 4:51
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    The first is preferred because the second is using a question form (who is he?) in a sentence which is not a question. #2 is thus grammatically incorrect.
    – RichF
    Feb 20, 2017 at 5:27

1 Answer 1

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There are no tanks to draw the water from.
There are no tanks from which to take the water.

a difference between your two sentences is that "draw water" is an old term which is usually used to describe getting water from a well, not usually from something as modern as a "tank". "Take" could be used for either situation, however both phrasings would be understood.

In your second set of sentences, the phrasing is usually

No teachers to get the result from.
No teachers from whom to get the result.

since usually results are "given" by teachers or people in authority and not "taken".

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  • I agree with Peter, the word draw -- though we understand it, is not really used like this any longer. The water was drawn from the tank, through the pipe to the tap. Now we'd probably say, "The water comes from the tank, through the pipes to the tap."
    – WRX
    Feb 18, 2017 at 20:39
  • Peter, I have a minor quibble. The word tank has a usage, that while archaic in many places, is still common in Texas and Oklahoma. It refers to what most of us would call a pond, but is usually man-made and is used to store water. Texas Primer: The Stock Tank Thus "drawing water from a tank" is not necessarily anachronistic.
    – RichF
    Feb 18, 2017 at 21:08
  • Curious if tank retained similar usage elsewhere, I found Irrigation tank at the Wikipedia. This seems to be from India.
    – RichF
    Feb 18, 2017 at 21:29
  • tanks are vessels used to hold water, e.g. "water tank", is used often enough, if you drive down the highway in the US you may see water tanks / towers which look like golf balls on a golf tee. However, one would not usually say draw water from the tank these days, usually get, "get water from the tank" will suffice. In the case of Stock Tanks, the "tanks" are stationary and the cattle must go to the tank.
    – Peter
    Feb 19, 2017 at 2:56
  • 1 I want to know who he is. 2 I want to know who is he. Do they mean the same thing? Which one is preferred? Feb 20, 2017 at 4:51

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