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The following two sentences used different expressions. 'where' and '. There'. I want to know the difference of feeling between them.

  1. He emigrated to New York City where he started a small trucking business.
  2. He emigrated to New York City. There he started a small trucking business.

Thank you for your reply.

  • 2
    They have the same meaning, so why use two sentences to convey that when one sentence will do the job just as adequately? Use 1. – BillJ Feb 20 '17 at 16:37
  • There is no difference in meaning. If both clauses were longer, the second version might be preferable because there enables you to divide it into two separate sentences, whereas where does not. Other than that, it's purely a matter of stylistic choice. – JavaLatte Feb 20 '17 at 23:59
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You're asking about the nuance. If there is one, I would say it's this:

In the first example, "where he started a small trucking business" could be view as incidental information. Surely he did many things after he emigrated to New York City. In this interpretation of the difference, the author could have picked one representative item to add some flavor.

Example two describes a sequence of two events, both critical to the story. "There he started a small trucking business" stands on its own as a separate sentence. In the narrative, it's the next action of importance he did after arriving in New York, clearly not simply incidental information.

  • incidental information and a sequence of two events. Thank you for your help. – JS.Kim. Feb 21 '17 at 13:44
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If seen upper level no difference actually.

But, He emigrated to New York City where he started a small trucking business.

'Where' here is used for joining two sentences.

He emigrated to New York City. There he started a small trucking business.

'There' here is used to emphasize something.

Note: I might not be correct completely.

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