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Hello can you help me with this one? I can't seem to find the error in this sentence. My teacher told us to correct the grammatical error here.

That runner on the track team always wins races because he has no fear of leaving some skin on the pavement.

Is it the "leaving some skin on the pavement"? Because I can't understand this phrase and I think it doesn't have a connection with the first independent clause, so I just guess perhaps this is really the error here. I'm not sure. Can you help me?

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    I've read the sentence several times and I'm not spotting any error. – fixer1234 Feb 23 '17 at 6:50
  • BTW, "leaving some skin on the pavement" refers to falling and scraping his skin on the pavement. He wins races because he doesn't allow himself to be distracted focusing on caution or worrying about falling. – fixer1234 Feb 23 '17 at 6:57
  • It doesn't seem very natural to me, but I don't see any grammatical errors. "runner on the track team keeps winning races" sounds like a needless repetition: you wouldn't have a pole vaulter on the track team, and a runner isn't likely to win the javelin competition. – JavaLatte Feb 23 '17 at 7:03
  • I think "That runner on the track team always wins races because he does not have fear of leaving some skin on the pavement." is correct. Because sentence indicates general situation and not perfect situation. – user4084 Jun 13 '17 at 10:27
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That runner on the track team always wins races because he has no fear of leaving some skin on the pavement.

To my eyes, it reads somewhat awkwardly with "that" in the beginning of the sentence and superfluous, in my opinion, "on the track team" which urges me to slightly reword it like this:

That the runner wins races is because he has no fear of leaving some skin on the pavement.

With "This" instead of "That", this urge disappears:

This runner always wins races because he has no fear of leaving some skin on the pavement.

In case you're pointing your finger to the runner, it might be

That runner over there always wins races because he has no fear of leaving some skin on the pavement.

  • Yes...Which sentence is correct -- "That dog in your yard bit me." or "The dog in your yard bit me." I don't know. I would argue that if you are not currently looking into the yard and referencing a dog that is currently in the back yard, you would use "the dog". "That dog" may have wandered off in which case "That dog" doesn't work. – EllieK Mar 7 '18 at 17:07
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I don't see a grammatical error, but maybe the expected answer is "leaving skin on the pavement", which sounds a bit more natural to me (on the model of "having skin in the game", which goes to the same idea of risking losing skin i.e. getting hurt, and not being afraid of it in the case of the runner).

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